Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $13,754

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built for testing purposes. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bugfixes.

Be aware though that they may be unstable. Additionally, Web+ and some other packages have to be installed separately.

If you're OK with that, you'll find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

[GSoC 2014] Haiku ARM port

Blog post by dnivra on Thu, 2014-04-24 09:29
Hello everyone!
Most of you know that 4 students have been chosen to work with Haiku during the Google Summer of Code(GSoC) 2014. My name is Arvind and I am one of the 4 students(yaay!). I will be improving the ARM port and hopefully make significant progress.

Accepted Students

Four students to be mentored by Haiku in Google Summer of Code 2014!

For this year's Google Summer of Code™ program, we at Haiku have been allocated four students! In 2014, 371 mentoring organizations applied and 4420 students submitted 6313 proposals. Haiku is proud to be one of the 190 accepted mentoring organizations, with four accepted students.

Over the years, Haiku's goals for Google Summer of Code have evolved. Originally the ability to evaluate the students' capabilities was lacking and the attention was simply on choosing projects that filled a need. Now, the emphasis is placed on choosing the best students, as they are more important than their short term code contributions. During the application process, those students instilled a sense of hope and confidence in Haiku's mentors that they will mature into full project contributors. In other words, this is our opportunity to grow and refine young, intelligent, and highly motivated students into people who will continue to develop Haiku in the years to come.

In recent years, students applying to Haiku were (at first encouraged and later) required to submit a code contribution. By requiring potential students to submit a code contribution during the application period, Haiku's mentors achieve several things. First and foremost, it shows that each student possesses basic skills that many of us take for granted -- using a bug tracker and compiling Haiku's sources. More importantly, it provides our mentors with some insight into each individual student's motivation and abilities. This year a total of 9 patches were submitted during the application period (Two were sent to the [haiku] mailing list due to user registration issues and will be migrated to Trac [1, 2]).

WebKit weekly report #28

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Fri, 2014-04-18 08:13

Hello everyone,

Slow progress on the code this week...

I fixed two small issues in the video decoding code: a useless notification was sent, leading to very high cpu usage on jamendo.com (and possibly other places). And, the video drawing was not always using B_OP_COPY. This led to CPU waste as the mode used could be slower (B_OP_OVER has to scan each pixel to see if it is transparent), and created some drawing glitches on some videos.

The Heartbleed Aftermath... Some Things You Should Know

News posted on Fri, 2014-04-11 17:28

As most of our visitors have probably already heard in the last few days - one of the largest security disasters I can recall in modern internet history was discovered, and dubbed "Heartbleed".

WebKit weekly report #27

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Fri, 2014-04-11 06:54

Hello world!

Progress on WebKit this week happens in various areas.

On the testsuite first: I fixed several small issues that triggered asserts when WebKit was built with asserts enabled. This includes a problem with the sequencing of events when loading an invalid URL, and a double deletion of an object when iframes are involved. These two problems could have created some real-world issues, so WebKit should be a little bit more stable now. Another problem was the lack of "key up" events and mixup of keycodes vs characters in the testsuite keyboard simulator, which prevented us to test the editing code in an useful way. Another problem was some browser settings were modified by some tests (such as the text size, and page zoom factor), and not reset before running the following tests. This led to some unexpected errors which are now avoided. With these issues fixed, I can have a look at the remaining failing tests, knowing that they are more likely to uncover actual bugs.

WebKit weekly report #26 - Video support!

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Fri, 2014-04-04 07:02

Hello everyone!

The good news first: I'll be working on WebKit for another month. Thanks to everyone who donated some money to make this possible. As said in the previous weeks, I'm now working part-time on another project to make this last longer.

And then, the very good news: HTML video is working!

Miracles do happen; Development contract for April!

News posted on Mon, 2014-03-31 20:40

Wow. Thanks to our donors' generousity, Adrien is able to continue for a seventh month of improving WebPositive, WebKit and its related techologies. $2145 has been raised this past month! This is spot on with the number mentioned in last month's contract announcement article.

If you did not hear, Adrien has started working on HTML5 Audio/Video support, specifically the audio portion. As usual, he is publishing weekly progress reports on his blog. Periodically, new builds of WebKit and WebPositive are merged into the nightly images.

Once again, allow me to extend our gratitude to everyone who has and continues to donate. The yearly total is now soaring past $13000, which could make 2014 our best year yet. Each and everyone of you are helping to make Haiku a better product. Thank you! If you have not yet donated, this is the perfect time to do so.