Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $23,862

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

2011: From the desk of Haiku, Inc.

News posted on Tue, 2012-01-03 03:42

2011 has been an amazing year for Haiku in many ways. It is easy to see the improvements in Haiku (the operating system) by looking at the nightly builds or the bug tracker. In quite such a tangible way. Haiku, Inc. serves as the business arm of the project, if you will, collecting donations, handling paperwork, dealing with web hosting, etc. It is a little harder to see some of the improvements in Haiku, Inc. sometimes - they are a little more "behind the scenes", so we wanted to take this time to talk about all of the good stuff that has happened!

API Design is Hard, Finding Bugs (Can be Made) Easy!

Blog post by mmlr on Fri, 2011-12-23 19:34

Puh, time has passed again and the signals from my side might have been a bit confusing with only the last blog post in mind. Therefore I'm going to explain what provoked that flurry of seemingly unrelated commits and how the KeyStore API is coming along.

The Haiku Tutorial is Here!

Blog post by RhapsodyGuru on Tue, 2011-12-06 23:40

Greetings Haiku-ers!

So... I have finally gotten around to finishing the Haiku tutorial I set out to complete over a year ago. I was hoping to have it done sooner, but I decided to then prolong graduation for another year. However, my thesis project has been a rocking success, and you can finally see the fruits of my labors. :D

This production should be incorporated into the project as official tutorial material. I am very happy to have been involved in this project, and I sincerely thank everyone for their support... especially Matt Madia for green-lighting the project and Joe Prostko for his assistance and unswerving benevolence. I hope you all find this interesting and enjoyable to watch. The target audience for this production is geared towards those into Linux/BSD/et al, but are curious about Haiku and what it can do for them. Please feel free to opine in the comments section below! I want to hear all of your thoughts! :D

This video is licensed under the Creative Commons (Attrib / No-Derivs) license. This work is owned in its entirety by Haiku, Inc. and the project.

EDIT: Some of you have requested the source link for the video. You can find it at the following link... http://vimeo.com/33197748

From Bugs back to Wireless and Friends

Blog post by mmlr on Mon, 2011-11-28 02:04

As this week concludes I'd like to post an update on what I've been up to and what I'll be working on next. After fixing a few kernel issues and looking into some others I've come to a point where I'll gradually refocus back on some of the tasks I left open before mentally entering the kernel debugging land. In this blog post I'll also try to describe some of what I did this week to hopefully make it a bit more accessible.

University of Auckland: Scholarship awarded! Call for Students/Visitors!

News posted on Sat, 2011-11-19 17:08

Exciting times these are. Haiku, Inc. steadily marches towards being capable of funding a core developer for 12 months of contractual development. Thank you donors! BeGeistert 024 has spurred a flurry of commits, even continuing past the coding sprint. Google has accepted Haiku as a mentoring organization in its Google Code-in 2011 program. The version control system has been migrated from subversion to git. Thank you sys-admins! And on top of all this, the University of Auckland has awarded Alex "yourpalal" Wilson with a 2011/12 International Summer Scholarship for a research project in Haiku! And the university has placed an open call for additional students and visitors!

Greetings (mostly) from the Kernel (Debugging Land)

Blog post by mmlr on Thu, 2011-11-17 17:00

So what is going on right now in the time I spend on my Haiku contract? For the past two and a half weeks I've had my mind wrapped around various parts of the kernel. Things started out at BeGeistert and the coding sprint following it. The nice thing about the coding sprint is that you spend a lot of time with very knowledgeable people and can therefore tackle things that you would usually shy away from. In this case, Ingo Weinhold and I were seeing some random memory corruption problems and an apparent memory/pages leak. So we started investigating those by adding more debug functions into the relevant parts.

2011 Google Code-In Contest, Haiku Selected as One of Eighteen Participating Organzations

Blog post by scottmc on Thu, 2011-11-10 04:18

Haiku has been selected as one of eighteen organizations to participate in the Google Code-In 2011!

Once again Haiku has been selected to participate in Google Code-In. To read the announcement and to see what other organizations were selected see [1] below. Here's some basic information on the contest:


Google Code-In 2011 logo

Google's contest to introduce pre-university students to the many kinds of contributions that make open source software development possible, is starting on November 21, 2011. We are inviting students worldwide to produce a variety of open source code, documentation, training materials and user experience research for the organizations participating this year. These tasks include:

1. Code: Tasks related to writing or refactoring code
2. Documentation: Tasks related to creating/editing documents
3. Outreach: Tasks related to community management and outreach/marketing
4. Quality Assurance: Tasks related to testing and ensuring code is of high quality
5. Research: Tasks related to studying a problem and recommending solutions
6. Training: Tasks related to helping others learn more
7. Translation: Tasks related to localization
8. User Interface: Tasks related to user experience research or user interface design and interaction

Official Google Code-In website and to review the updated rules for 2011. [2]

Over the next couple of weeks we will be busy getting our task list in order and putting together a good group of Haiku mentors for this. Many of the tasks will be for translations, so we may still need a few more mentors to cover some of those tasks. If you are interested in mentoring please let us know on the mailing list. For a preview of some of the possible Haiku tasks, you can check the wiki page we used for gathering ideas. [3]

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