Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $13,754

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built for testing purposes. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bugfixes.

Be aware though that they may be unstable. Additionally, Web+ and some other packages have to be installed separately.

If you're OK with that, you'll find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Donation rally successful

News posted on Fri, 2010-03-05 12:38

It's not just Stippi's project that's a huge success (see the WebKit/Web+ progress documented in his blog posts). Our call for donations for this kind of contractual work is also doing very well!
In the two weeks since our announcement to hire developers for specific projects, donations have picked up significantly. Since then we received over $1,600USD and a few more people opting for small but recurrent monthly funding.

Our thanks go out to all contributors! This shows that our Haiku community is strong and effective when called upon!

My Impressions from SCaLE 2010

Blog post by koki on Wed, 2010-03-03 18:00
From right to left: Scott, Bruno and myself (the three Haiku stooges?) at the Hollywood Walk of Fame. From right to left: Scott, Bruno and myself (the three Haiku stooges?) at the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Southern California Linux Expo – or the SCaLE show as it is also widely known – was the very first mainstream open source conference that Haiku exhibited at. This was back in February of 2007, when Michael Phipps, Axel Dorfler, Bruno G. Albuquerque and myself gathered in LA to show Haiku to the world for the first time (photos here). Following the once a year tradition that SCaLE has become since then, Bruno G. Albuquerque, Scott McCreary and myself gathered to represent Haiku at the SCaLE 2010 conference, recently held in Los Angeles on the weekend of February 20th and 21st.

On Saturday morning, the three of us gathered on the exhibit floor at around 9:00AM, one hour before the exhibition was scheduled to open to the public. This gave us plenty of time to prepare the booth, especially because we had already setup the projector screen on the backwall the evening before. We placed the HAIKU table runner over the 7 feet long table that we had at the booth, and then laid out – from left to right – Scott's AMD dual core laptop, my small cube-sized Intel dual core desktop hooked to a projector, and an 8-core laptop that belonged to Bruno's girlfriend. As handouts, we had the new Haiku flier as well as 50 alpha 1 CDs that Scott had burned on Lightscribe media.

WebPositive emerges

Blog post by stippi on Tue, 2010-03-02 21:18

Wow, it's been 10 days already since I posted my first blog entry on my work on WebKit and the native web browser. Of course my continous updates to the package I posted in my first article will probably have spoiled most of the surprise, but HaikuLauncher has been reduced again into just a bare browser shell, while a new codebase, WebPositive, has been split off from it. Using WebPositive has become a whole lot more pleasing in the meantime. For those of you who have not followed the comments to the original blog, these are the things implemented since my first post on the project:

Diving into WebKit

Blog post by stippi on Tue, 2010-02-23 19:11

First of all, I want to thank Haiku, Inc. for giving me the opportunity to concentrate fully for a while on the WebKit port and browser! This is an awesome chance that I intend to make full use of.

At the moment, I have mixed feelings. Not about writing blogs. Not about working on WebKit. But about using the new WebKit browser to write the blog entry, haha! I've seen it crash, although in the last days, it has become pretty stable. After we upgraded to a newer WebKit version as the basis for the port, the frequent random crashes have almost disappeared and I saw only one crash in three days. Compared to one every few minutes before.

Haiku Inc. is hiring - funds needed

News posted on Sun, 2010-02-21 16:03

The Haiku project rests on the shoulders of volunteer individuals who spend their free time developing, bughunting and in general advancing the system. Unfortunately everyone's time is limited and working for a living takes a major cut into what could be dedicated to Haiku work. It would be great if a developer could take off work for a few weeks to fully concentrate on Haiku development.

And this is exactly what we would like to make possible! Starting now:

Mini report and pictures from FOSDEM 2010

Blog post by aldeck on Mon, 2010-02-08 15:21

Just came back from FOSDEM 2010, i don't have much to say, since it was quite a flash journey for me, i left home Sunday at 7:30AM and got back at 7:30PM. I originally planned to go on both days but this year Haiku didn't have its own stand, instead Haiku was present Sunday in the Alt-OS (ie: not Linux nor BSD) DevRoom in the form of several talks by François Revol, Olivier Coursière and Niels Reedijk. The Alt-OS DevRoom was a (~50 people capacity) class room, that François entirely managed and organized, he invited other projects to give talks and scheduled the talks.

Using malloc_debug to Find Memory Related Bugs

Blog post by mmlr on Mon, 2010-02-08 01:17

There's plenty of ways to introduce subtle bugs into your code that give you a hard time finding and fixing. In this post I'd like to introduce you to malloc_debug, a heap implementation with added debug helpers, and outline how it can be used to find some of these problems.