Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $23,862

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

WebPositive emerges

Blog post by stippi on Tue, 2010-03-02 21:18

Wow, it's been 10 days already since I posted my first blog entry on my work on WebKit and the native web browser. Of course my continous updates to the package I posted in my first article will probably have spoiled most of the surprise, but HaikuLauncher has been reduced again into just a bare browser shell, while a new codebase, WebPositive, has been split off from it. Using WebPositive has become a whole lot more pleasing in the meantime. For those of you who have not followed the comments to the original blog, these are the things implemented since my first post on the project:

Diving into WebKit

Blog post by stippi on Tue, 2010-02-23 19:11

First of all, I want to thank Haiku, Inc. for giving me the opportunity to concentrate fully for a while on the WebKit port and browser! This is an awesome chance that I intend to make full use of.

At the moment, I have mixed feelings. Not about writing blogs. Not about working on WebKit. But about using the new WebKit browser to write the blog entry, haha! I've seen it crash, although in the last days, it has become pretty stable. After we upgraded to a newer WebKit version as the basis for the port, the frequent random crashes have almost disappeared and I saw only one crash in three days. Compared to one every few minutes before.

Haiku Inc. is hiring - funds needed

News posted on Sun, 2010-02-21 16:03

The Haiku project rests on the shoulders of volunteer individuals who spend their free time developing, bughunting and in general advancing the system. Unfortunately everyone's time is limited and working for a living takes a major cut into what could be dedicated to Haiku work. It would be great if a developer could take off work for a few weeks to fully concentrate on Haiku development.

And this is exactly what we would like to make possible! Starting now:

Mini report and pictures from FOSDEM 2010

Blog post by aldeck on Mon, 2010-02-08 15:21

Just came back from FOSDEM 2010, i don't have much to say, since it was quite a flash journey for me, i left home Sunday at 7:30AM and got back at 7:30PM. I originally planned to go on both days but this year Haiku didn't have its own stand, instead Haiku was present Sunday in the Alt-OS (ie: not Linux nor BSD) DevRoom in the form of several talks by François Revol, Olivier Coursière and Niels Reedijk. The Alt-OS DevRoom was a (~50 people capacity) class room, that François entirely managed and organized, he invited other projects to give talks and scheduled the talks.

Using malloc_debug to Find Memory Related Bugs

Blog post by mmlr on Mon, 2010-02-08 01:17

There's plenty of ways to introduce subtle bugs into your code that give you a hard time finding and fixing. In this post I'd like to introduce you to malloc_debug, a heap implementation with added debug helpers, and outline how it can be used to find some of these problems.

Everyone loves benchmarks

Blog post by stippi on Tue, 2010-01-12 15:23

In these exciting times, during which Ingo Weinhold is making great progress with some performance optimizations in the Haiku kernel, I felt this strong urge to conduct some benchmark results, even if that caused me great deal of pain in setting up all the test platforms! The results are quite interesting, even though I didn't manage to test all possible combinations of host platforms and file systems.

The History Channel: 2003 Interview with Michael Phipps

Blog post by koki on Sat, 2009-11-28 04:20

In 2003 early, myself and a few Japanese BeOS fans founded the Japan BeOS Network, JPBE in short, a community based user group created mainly in response to the resurgence of BeOS in the form of the ZETA operating system (which was being developed by the German company yellowTAB). While the enthusiasm of the community built around ZETA, I felt it was important to educate the Japanese community about Haiku (then still called OpenBeOS); so I decided to do an interview of Michael Phipps, Haiku's project leader in those early days. I am posting this interview here for historical purposes, but also because I think it may be useful to familiarize newcomers with the history of the project and in some way as a tribute to all Michael gave to Haiku during his tenure. Enjoy!