Haiku is a new open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2014

Goal: $35,000
  $13,754

WHAT'S NEW IN HAIKU DEVELOPMENT

The Haiku source is continually built for testing purposes. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bugfixes.

Be aware though that they may be unstable. Additionally, Web+ and some other packages have to be installed separately.

If you're OK with that, you'll find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Introducing the Evanston Haiku User Group (eHUG)

News posted by Yuri Wordsmith on Thu, 2008-05-22 19:19

I am pleased to announce that a new Haiku User Group is being started in Chicago. The Evanston Haiku User Group (eHUG) is the second user group in the US focused on Haiku, and we have a temporary website at ehug.wordpress.com. We are very similar to other user groups already in existence, but one of the differences between the eHUG and other HUGs is the fact that one of our primary goals is to design and build a computer specifically for Haiku. We currently have two members and the president of the group is Yuri Wordsmith, myself.

Steady Progress towards Alpha 1

News posted by stippi on Sun, 2008-05-18 11:27

This weekend, the Haiku project has seen some nice leaps forward. Two items are especially noteworthy: Ingo Weinhold and Axel Dörfler have finally nailed bug 2059. This bug specifically prevented serious use of Haiku for anything else than testing, since it meant that the kernel could crash at any time, especially when there was heavy disk activity. All that was supposed to be written to disk at the time of the crash was lost. Luckily, due to prior fixes to the file system journaling and log replay, it didn't mean that your entire file system would be corrupted, but at least anything that you were working on at the time would be lost. So the fix for this particular bug is getting us much closer to our goal of a usable self hosting situation in which you can actually use Haiku for development. This is our most important goal to reach before we wanted to release the first alpha of R1.

The second noteworthy achievement is build system support for a mixed GCC4/GCC2 Haiku environment. It has been known for quite some time, thanks to the explorations of Haiku developer Michael Lotz, that it was possible to set up a GCC4 build of Haiku to run GCC2 applications or vice versa, by installing the respective libraries into certain places so that the correct versions are used for linking. What was missing was support in the runtime loader (the system component used to launch applications and link them to the shared libraries that they use) to do this automatically and on a system wide level. Also missing was support in the build system to effortlessly produce such a hybrid Haiku build. Both of these items have now been implemented by Haiku developer Ingo Weinhold. Also related to this, Michael Lotz had researched the stability issues that GCC4 builds of Haiku were suffering from some time ago and tracked them down to a problem in the specific GCC4 version that Haiku is using. They can be avoided by simply turning off a certain compiler optimization feature. All this combined means Haiku can use GCC4 itself while maintaining our stated goal of binary compatibility to the large pool of GCC2 applications in an automated and transparent fashion.

A few serious issues remain before we can release the first alpha. Some concern missing or buggy functionality that affect the self hosting goal with regards to the development tool chain. A completely native port of Subversion is the last item on this list. As far as I know, some bugs in the TCP implementation are preventing it, but progress is being made on this front as you read this. Formal testing is being conducted to make sure the entire tool chain will work correctly and reliably. Axel Dörfler is currently working on the device manager, the system component which manages everything concerning hardware and drivers. There are some issues with regards to hardware interrupts that, when fixed, will hopefully clear up some driver problems that can be experienced on certain hardware.

I want to conclude with a big "Thank You" to everyone who is helping with tracking and reporting issues in our bug tracker and to everyone providing patches and of course to the Haiku developers themselves! Personally, I am very excited about the progress that is being made. Thanks to everyone who is contributing towards this goal!

Call to Arms: Haiku Code Drive 2008

News posted by koki on Thu, 2008-05-15 19:27
The Haiku Community

Google assigned Haiku five student slots for the Google Summer of Code 2008, so we had to narrow down our final choice from the many high quality student applications. This was tough: many good applications had to be left out, and we really hate leaving people out, particularly those who had shown an interest in Haiku. So we started entertaining the idea of sponsoring a few of these students ourselves. Today we introduce you to the Haiku Code Drive 2008, a program designed to raise funds from the community in order to sponsor students to produce code for Haiku. This is how it's going to work.

We contacted all the GSoC students that applied for Haiku but did not make it, and asked them if they were interested in carrying out their proposed project for a $2,500 stipend each. From their response, we have created this list of students and their projects; these are the candidates for the Haiku Code Drive 2008 program. Now we are asking you, the Haiku community, to fund the program by making donations. We will then hold a public poll so that the community can influence which candidates/projects they want to sponsor. At the end of the poll/donation period, we will determine how many and which of the students will be sponsored based on the donated funds and the results of the poll. Check out all the details of the program here, including a timeline with tentative dates.

We are not going to even try to figure out how many students we will sponsor; instead, we will just let the community influence the outcome by means of their generosity first and eventually their choice through the open poll. Needless to say, the more the community can afford to donate, the more students we will be able to sponsor, the more Haiku can potentially benefit.

We think this program will benefit Haiku in a number of ways. First, it will allow us to reward at least a few of the students that applied for Haiku at the GSoC but could not make it; and in doing so, it will also contribute to the growth of our developer base. Needless to say, the work resulting from this program can also bring advancements in various areas of the Haiku code base. But perhaps as importantly, this will also provide an opportunity for the community to contribute financially towards tangible goals, something that we have not done well in the past. All this, of course, with the usual ultimate goal in mind: to further advance Haiku towards that release we all so much want.

We know that many long time followers and lurkers as well as newcomers to our project have been waiting for a good reason to donate to Haiku. We are hoping that the community will grab this opportunity and show their generosity for our project. So show us your love for Haiku and start making those donations now. You only have until May 29, so don't wait!

And don't forget to spread the word!

Haiku Code Drive 2008 Links

Teldar's BeServed Open Sourced, Code Merged into Haiku Repository

News posted by koki on Sat, 2008-04-26 10:33

As recently noted by Haiku developer Axel Dörfler on the development mailing list, Teldar Corporation has open sourced their BeServed network file sharing solution for BeOS and donated the code to Haiku. We are now pleased to announce that the donated code has been merged into the Haiku repository, and is available here. The package, donated to Haiku under the MIT license, contains user management and servers for several operating systems including, Microsoft Windows® and Linux®. While Haiku already has a native networking file system that has been in the works by Ingo Weinhold, the availability of the BeServed code will allow cross-pollination between the two code bases, eventually resulting in а powerful and solid native networking solution for Haiku.

Kevin Musick of Teldar Corporation had these words for us: "I am pleased to donate BeServed in its entirety to the Haiku project. After Be, Inc.'s demise, BeServed was no longer commercially viable and the pressures of my career and a young family forced me to pursue other opportunities. However, I am encouraged to see Haiku's progress and the ongoing commitment of the community. While I no longer have the bandwidth to participate in the project, I hope that BeServed will be useful in some small way. Congratulations on your progress and best wishes for continued success!"

BeServed is a network file system with support for attributes, MIME-based typing, indexing, and queries, all features available in the BFS file system as well as the open source version of BFS that Haiku uses. BeServed also features remote shared volume mounting as well as folder sharing management capabilities, giving the end user the ability to manage all their files with the powerful and unique advantages of the BFS file system over a LAN.

Thank you to Kevin for making this possible!

Haiku Gets Five Student Slots for GSoC 2008

News posted by stippi on Mon, 2008-04-21 20:42

After a quite intensive and challenging review and selection process, we are pleased to announce that Haiku has been assigned five (5) student slots for the Google Summer of Code 2008. This year, Google accepted many more mentor organizations than ever before, which made the allotment of students slots a lot more competitive. We also received applications of very high quality, which is definitely a blessing, but also made the Haiku mentor's task of narrowing down to a final selection much tougher. After thorough review of all the applications, and carefully taking into consideration factors such as immediate benefits for our project, the likelihood of getting long-term contributors, and the availability of an appropriate mentor for any given project, we have come up with the final list of students that will be coding for Haiku during the GSoC 2008 program. Here it is:

Paging (swap file) support

  • Student: Zhao Shuai
  • Mentor: Ingo Weinhold

Zeroconf support (automatic network service discovery)

  • Student: Alexandru Roman
  • Mentor: Ryan Leavengood

HPET and other timers (new ways for tracking system time)

  • Student: Dustin Howett
  • Mentor: Stefano Ceccherini

Sub-pixel antialiased rendering in the app_server

  • Student: Andrej Spielmann
  • Mentor: Stephan Aßmus

CIFS client (access to Windows shares)

  • Student: Adrien Lemaire
  • Mentor: Bruno G. Albuquerque

Please join us in giving a warm welcome to all the accepted students. Make them feel part of the Haiku community, as we want them to stay beyond the summer. And remember: their success is our success, so anything that we can do to assist the students complete their GSoC project successfully is for our benefit too.

We also want to thank all the other students that applied for a Haiku project but could not make it. We would have liked to accept them all, but that is sadly not possible. That being said, we are considering our own summer of code to sponsor one or more projects on our own, so please stick around. Better yet, if you are interested in this idea, contact us to discuss the details. To the community, stay tuned for more details, as you may have an opportunity to help make this happen.

Last but not least, a big thank you to the Haiku mentors who are committing their time to the success of this year's Google Summer of Code and, of course, to Google itself for making this happen and giving us the opportunity to participate again this year.

A weekend in SF, for LugRadio Live USA 2008

Blog post by koki on Thu, 2008-04-17 23:00
Scott at the Haiku boothScott at the Haiku booth

I spent this past weekend in San Francisco in order to attend the LugRadio Live USA 2008 event. Together with Scott McCreary (of BeDrivers.com fame), we organized a Haiku booth to represent the project at this the first LugRadio Live event to be held in the US. This event was a bit of a mystery to me, in the sense that I did not know what to expect. It certainly turned out to be an interesting and fruitful experience, not only because of the usual increased visibility that results from having a booth at any open source event, but also because it gave us the chance to get to know and network with quite a few interesting individuals.

I drove into San Francisco on Friday afternoon, as I wanted to check out the exhibit floor at the Metreon and also see if I could setup our projector screen in our booth in advance. We were originally told that there would be a "no hanging stuff from the wall" policy, but it turned out that it was OK for us to hang the projector screen from the tube holding the backwall drapes behind our booth. And that's exactly what I did: with the kind help of one of the on-site crew and a couple of plastic cable straps that I had brought in my show box, I had the screen setup in no time. I spoke with the on-site staff about wireless access, and got all the info that I needed to get my ethernet-wifi adaptor working, so that we could have internet access from Haiku. Once I had the plan for the next day more or less clear in my head, I called it a day, and went back to my hotel room to relax until dinner time.

Haiku Websites Stats and Other Trivia

Blog post by koki on Fri, 2008-04-04 23:34

I admit it: I have a weakness for website statistics. So late last year, I added Google Analytics (GA) to the Haiku website. GA gives you a wide array of information such as number of visits, page views, bounce rates, as well as geographic data and information related to the used operating systems. I wanted to get see this information myself, but I also wanted to share it with the community (don't worry, it's all anonymous data), so that everyone can get a peek at another and different metrics of how our project keeps growing over time. So here is a brief activity overview for the Haiku websites for the January thru March of 2008 period.