gsoc

Google Summer of Code 2011 Results!

News posted on Sat, 2011-09-03 18:44

Hot summer of code
Students learned a lot, had fun
Everyone wins!

Friday August 26th 2011 marked the end of Google Summer of Code™ 2011 and, once again, Haiku did great with 4 out of the 8 initial students passing the final evaluation (7 were actually evaluated, 1 having unfortunately failed at midterm). The raw numbers might be a little bit deceiving, given that the fundamental goal of the program is ultimately to attract new contributors to the project; and early indications are pointing toward a success in that perspective.

Google Summer of Code 2010: Wrap up report

News posted on Sun, 2010-09-12 15:36
Google Summer of Code 2010 Logo jpeg

In the past four years, the Haiku Project has had both the honor and privilege of being a Mentoring Organization in Google Summer of Code™. This is a wonderful opportunity for the Project, as it exposes Haiku to many potential youthful and energetic minds that are interested in developing Open Source Software. Even more exciting, it provides a unique opportunity of generating income for the Project while growing a handful of carefully selected students into knowledgeable and potential long-term contributors.

Seven students to be mentored by Haiku in Google Summer of Code 2010!

News posted on Thu, 2010-04-22 19:14

For this year's Google Summer of Code™ program, we at Haiku have been allocated seven students! Initially, we were allocated six students, but through a combination of good fortune and due diligence of our administrator Matthew Madia, an extra slot was allocated in the final days! In 2010, 367 mentoring orgs applied and there were 5539 proposals submitted by students. Of those, Haiku is one of 152 accepted organizations and had 26 submitted proposals.

Wrap-up Reports 2009 : Google Summer of Code, Haiku Code Drive

News posted on Mon, 2009-09-21 03:18

This year eight students were funded to work with Haiku during the summer months, six from Google in their Google Summer of Code program and two from Haiku Inc. for Haiku Code Drive. It is both my pleasure and honor to announce that overall this year has been more successful than last. Five of the six Google Summer of Code students passed, as well as one of two Haiku Code Drive students. On top of this achievement, Adrien Destugues and Bryce Groff were granted commit access for Haiku. Maxime Simon was approved by WebKit to receive commit access as well!

Before getting into the actual results for each student, it is worth re-visiting how we got here. This is the third year in which Haiku was selected to participate in Google Summer of Code. Each year we, as an organization, strive to improve our process for both the participating students and our community. Perhaps the most significant modification was the introduction of requiring students to resolve one or more tickets in our bug tracker. The intention was to ensure each applicant had a minimal level of exposure to our project. This includes navigating and building Haiku's source code, as well as communicating through our mailing lists and other collaboration tools. Having the requirement fairly open ended allowed the applicants to provide our mentors with initial insight to their motivation, skill, and communicative abilities. The results speak for themselves: an increased number of passing students puts the proverbial stamp of approval on this new addition to our selection process. And now for the summaries for each student...

Summer of Code: Progress within the first month

News posted by mmadia on Fri, 2009-06-26 18:29

There have been some exciting developments from our Google Summer of Code and Haiku Code Drive students, even though it is only the first of three month. Here's a brief summary from most of the students. Be sure to visit their blogs for additional information and the occasional screenshot.

Adrien Destugues

Lately, his work has been focusing on the catalogs for translating applications. These provide the mappings from one language to another. The initial mechanism is functional with Haiku's API and allows any application to be translated. This functionality is better explained in his blog post. The International Components for Unicode or simply known as "ICU" and a preflet for selecting the desired locale are other major aspects to be implemented. Amongst other features, ICU will provide the formatting conversions for date, time, monetary, and locale specific characters. Further down the road (and beyond GSoC) is an API wrapper for the gettext library, which can interface with posix applications.

Maxime Simon

Maxime and his mentor, Ryan Leavengood have been working together on both laying the foundation for a native browser, as well as updating WebKit to the newest codebase. In short, some of Maxime's work has been on browser specific features, including the bookmarking library, toolbar, and designing the multiple rendering processes support. Earlier this month, his work has shifted towards WebKit. Primarily migrating the Haiku specific code from the previous port to the current codebase and continuing it. For a more in depth explanation, look at his most recent blog post.

Johannes Wischert

Earlier this week, his Gumstix Overo Water and Tobi expansion board arrived. Previously he has been using Qemu to emulate a Gumstix verdex as a testbed. His work has been focusing on the kernel and u-boot loader. The u-boot loader will be capable of loading the haiku_loader, which in turn will load kernel directly from a BFS partition. MMU related code and a driver for the microSD card reader are planned to be worked on next.

Bryce Groff

Several patches have landed in Haiku's source tree; changesets: 31234, 31235, 31236, and 31237. These allow BFS partitions to be created and deleted. On a side note -- testing of DriveSetup has been done inside Haiku running inside Qemu on Haiku!

Ankur Sethi

CLucene has been ported to Haiku and exists as an OptionalPackage for the build system. CLucene is the library that provides the searching APIs. The indexing daemon has some initial functionality. One of the responsibilities of the indexing daemon is to determine which files need to be indexed or to have their indexed data refreshed. Being able to search the results and handling non-plain text files via translators are two items that are on his todo list.

Raghu Nagireddy

The FUSE module hooks for almost all the necessary functions have been implemented. Most of the remaining functions that will be implemented are of lesser importance and require some research into Haiku's kernel Virtual File System. After that, the remaining work would be to get the FUSE library compiled with fs-shell, eg adding the necessary Jam rules. Since the FUSE module is host system binary, it can be debugged using tools of his host platform.

Interviews : Google Summer of Code Applicants

News posted by mmadia on Mon, 2009-05-04 14:27

In celebration and recognition of the hard work put in by all of this year's Google Summer of Code applicants, several of Haiku's news sites have coordinated with each other to provide those students with an opportunity to be interviewed. These interviews will be covered by BeOSNews, BeGroovy, Haiku Gazette, Haikuware, and IsComputerOn, and will be spread out over the following two weeks.

Update: All of the received interviews have now been posted! I would like to congratulate and thank all of the participating newsites on this extensive collaboration effort. If any additional translations become available, feel free to Contact Me

Update: IsComputerOn has conducted another interview with Alexey Burshtein

[1] Even though Johannes speaks English, his native language is German. As such Haiku Gazette was able to conduct the interview. The English translation will be provided to IsComputerOn.
[2] Tom was interviewed in English by his mentor, Pier Luigi Fiorini.

Google Allocates Six Students for Haiku in Summer of Code 2009!

News posted by mmadia on Sat, 2009-04-18 00:26

We are pleased to announce that Google has allotted us with six students for this year's Summer of Code program! This is quite an achievement, seeing as how Google accepted only 1000 students, which is about 10% less than in 2008. As with the year before, the quality of the proposals submitted by students has increased significantly. This year, students who applied to Haiku were suggested to fix an issue in our bug tracker. This provided our mentors with a glimpse into the students' programming ability, as well as their ambition. Those contributions, several of which have already been committed to our SVN repository, proved to be a valuable resource when ranking the students. This allowed our mentors to strike a balance between projects that fill a need in Haiku and projects by students who have also shown themselves to be a worthy Google Summer of Code student. These students went above and beyond our requirements and expectations. They gave us hope that come October, November, and beyond, they will still be making contributions to our community. Since retaining students as community developers is one of the goals of Summer of Code, it weighed heavily in our decision. Without further ado, here is the list of students who will be sponsored by Google to contribute to Haiku in Google's Summer of Code 2009:

Internationalization support for Haiku

CIFS client Implementation

Port Haiku to ARM architecture

Update DriveSetup/Disk_Device

Integrate WebKit in Haiku native browser

Implementing ZeroConf support for Haiku with mDNSResponder

We encourage everyone to continue the hospitality that has always been a part of our community. This has become a well-earned reputation for the members of Haiku's community.

We would like to take this time to express our gratitude for all students who have submitted project proposals. Many of you have displayed that your abilities rival those who were accepted. It is an unfortunate situation that we were not allocated more student slots by Google. We are looking at ways to express our appreciation of your efforts so far. In addition we are investigating the possibility of sponsoring another Haiku Code Drive. At this point, no decision has been made and we are welcoming comments on regarding this matter. If you would like feedback regarding your proposal and suggestions for next year, feel free to contact (Matt Madia).

Thank you to all who have and continue to take the time to make Haiku's participation in Google Summer of Code a successful adventure. This includes Google for sponsoring Summer of Code, the Melange developers and contributors, and of course Haiku's Mentors.

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