Haiku is an open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

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What's New in Haiku development

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Icculus Microgrant 2020

Blog post by kallisti5 on Tue, 2021-02-23 14:08

Haiku, Inc. is proud to announce being the target of the Icculus Microgrant program for 2020. We would like to thank Icculus, and all of the wonderful folks who have donated to Haiku, Inc. over the years. Your continued donations help keep us working on what we love, and help us continuously grow and develop the ideal personal computing operating system.

Haiku activity report - January 2021

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Sat, 2021-02-06 10:53

Hello everyone, apparently we made it to 2021! This year we will see the 20th anniversary of Haiku. This report covers hrev54806-hrev54947. Architectures, ports, bootloaders PulkoMandy fixed the build of the openfirmware bootloader for PowerPC. It had been broken by changes for SPARC support. The openfirmware code to set up the splash screen was also fixed to work on sparc. tqh continues his work on cleaning and simplifying our EFI support.

Debugging RISCV-64 bootloader in QEMU

Blog post by kallisti5 on Sun, 2021-01-17 09:36

Debugging early bootloader code can be extremely difficult. The lack of printf and other classical black-box debugging tools means you’re limited to one of the following methods of debugging lockups: Arm chair debugging, Changing code, compiling, booting, repeat. Using GDB or another debugger tool and stepping through code watching outcome. Obviously #2 above is more ideal than #1. Welcome to debugging by attaching gdb to qemu! The steps below really should apply to any architecture.

Hello from the Haiku Promotion 'Team'!

Blog post by jt15s on Thu, 2020-12-31 21:33

Hi there, I’m jt15s, a new Haiku community member! I’ve been following the project for a few years now since I stumbled upon an article about Haiku. If you read the title (which I’m assuming you did), you’re probably going, “wait, we have a promotion team?” Well, yes, now we do. As an informal “team” of two (currently), we are super excited to share our plans to help promote Haiku and make more people aware of it.

Haiku activity report - November and December 2020

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Tue, 2020-12-22 10:53

Welcome to the November-December activity report! This report covers hrev54716-hrev54805 (about 5 weeks of work). Code cleanup mt fixed various warnings, use-after-free, memory leaks, and dead code problems detected by the clang static analyzer. X512 reworked app_server memory management to use owning pointers and avoid some memory leaks and use-after-free cases. This led to a rework of the classes used for that purpose, in particular AutoDeleter and its variants, to be more efficient and more flexible.

System Sounds Contest Wrap-up

News posted on Tue, 2020-12-08 12:00

Contest for Haiku System Sounds is finally over; and ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner! Before going into details, lots of thanks to all participants and voters are in order. Thanks to you, Haiku now has a cohesive high-quality sound set, that will hopefully make using Haiku even more pleasant and accessible. Without further ado, the winner is Garrett Kabler, with the sound theme “grubs-sparkly-tones” (previously named as “burgs-sparkly-tones”, name changed by the author due to a possible identity mixup)!

Haiku Depot and Better Icon Handling

Blog post by apl on Tue, 2020-11-17 12:00

HaikuDepot displays icons through a number of areas of its user interface. Early in the history of the Haiku packaging system, there were very few packages and very few icons. HaikuDepot started off by downloading each individually from HaikuDepotServer. Download as Tar then Unpack Downloading each icon file individually was fine for a while, but as the package and hence icon count grew it became necessary to rework this system. HaikuDepotServer later provided the icons as a compressed tar-ball containing all of the icons.

Haiku activity report - October 2020

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Mon, 2020-11-16 10:14

Welcome to the October activity report! I had managed to get other people to write the report for a few months, but not for October, apparently. So, I’m back! This report covers hrev54609-hrev54715 (about a month and a half work). The focus is not much on new and exciting features this month, there is a lot of bug fixing and cleanup work going on, as well as some performance improvements, and compatibility fixes for easier application porting.