Haiku is an open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the BeOS, Haiku is fast, simple to use, easy to learn and yet very powerful.

Fundraising 2017

Goal: $10,000
$8080

What's New in Haiku development

The Haiku source is continually built and released for testing purposes nearly every day. You can download and install these latest snapshots to check out the latest features and bug-fixes.

Be aware that nightly images may be unstable. Additionally, some packages included with official releases need to be installed separately.

If you're OK with this, you can find further instructions at our Nightly image page.

Haiku monthly activity report - 12/2017

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Sun, 2017-12-31 17:26

Welcome to the last report for the year 2017! Stats Who doesn't like them? I updated the Haiku stats to keep track of the activity in our git repository. The overall number of commits is very similar to 2016 (which was our quietest year so far) with more than 1300 commits (far from the 5555 commits in 2009). Our author of the year is waddlesplash with 213 commitsi, followed by PulkoMandy, Korli, Humdinger, Kallisti5, and Skipp_OSX.

New package repositories are now enabled by default

Blog post by waddlesplash on Sun, 2017-12-10 12:14

During this year’s coding sprint in Toulouse (which I was able to attend, thanks to being in Europe on a study-abroad program), I spent a lot of time massaging HaikuPorts to generate a consistent-enough state of packages for us to switch to them by default, and then making the in-tree changes necessary for the switch. Thanks to this and mmlr’s comprehensive overhaul of the HaikuPorter Buildmaster over the past couple months, we have finally switched to the new repositories by default as of hrev51620.

Haiku monthly activity report - 11/2017

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Sat, 2017-11-25 20:26

Hi there, This month has been quite filled with Haiku events, including two conferences and a coding sprint. Read on for our adventures climbing over a gate, planespotting, and eventually troubleshooting a real-scale flight simulator! This report also covers hrev51518-hrev51622. In order to better keep track of what happened during the sprint, this report is roughly in time order, rather than the usual categories. Week 1 Korli fixed a bug in the newly implemented posix_spawn, allowing the fish shell to use it without freezing.

Scripting the GUI with 'hey'

Blog post by humdinger on Sun, 2017-11-05 08:16

Haiku’s GUI is in principle entirely scriptable. You can change a window’s position and size and manipulate pretty much every widget in it. The tool to do this is hey. It sends BMessages to an application, thus emulating what happens if the user clicks on a menu, checkbox, or other widgets. The seminal work on this application scripting is the BeOS Application Scripting chapter of the BeOS Bible by Chris Herborth.

Haiku monthly activity report - 10/2017

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Sat, 2017-11-04 20:26

Hey there! It's time for the monthly report! This report covers hrev51465-hrev51517. Packages Not much changes on packages anymore since the plan is to switch to the new repos generated by the buildbots "real soon now" (but the repo is still missing some critical packages). However, some maintenance efforts are still done. The "bc" command is now moved to a separate package instead of being part of Haiku. Many packages were rebuilt and updated following ABI changes in BControlLook.

Back from GSoC mentor summit

Blog post by PulkoMandy on Mon, 2017-10-16 20:26

Hi there! This week-end was the Google Summer of Code mentor summit. This event gathers mentors from all organizations participating in GSoC and GCI for an event hosted by Google. Usually the summit happens at the same time as BeGeistert, and as a result I never made it there before. But with no BeGeistert happening this year, I could finally make it. Normally each organization is allowed to send 2 mentors, but we managed to get 6 people from Haiku to attend this year (by a combination of an extra mentor allowed because we do GCI, putting people on the waiting list and taking the slots freed by other orgs sending only one (or 0) mentor), having some Haiku people working at Google and helping run the event, and an hand-crafted badge to get into the event without registering)

Where is Haiku R1?

Blog post by kallisti5 on Mon, 2017-10-09 10:48

Haiku released R1 Alpha 4.1 on November 14th, 2012. (5 years ago next month). Since our last release, we have seen a huge number of groundbreaking new features slip into the nightly code including package management. Along with the addition of Package Management (which was added pretty shortly after R1A4), we were presented with the massive task of building “all the ports” into packages and maintaining their dependencies within our repositories.