Designing

A person with experience in graphic design has potential to be a very great help in ensuring that Haiku looks good and presents itself well to the public. The areas of design which a skilled hand is needed by an open source project are varied, but the style used needs to remain true to the over all branding of the project.

Therefore there are a number of guides to help designers stay true to the over all Haiku theme.

Check out the following areas where we need help with design:


GUI Interface

Enforcing the Haiku HIG

Haiku is an operating system which is known for its speed and being easy for anyone to use. This is partly because good programmers try to design their apps for more than just themselves. The Haiku Human Interface Guidelines provides a guide on making sure that app remain easy to use. You could read up the HIG and make sure that app follow it, or you could contact the people on the general haiku mailing list and discuss your ideas on human interface guidelines.

Mockups

A Mockup is when someone with design skills creates an image of how the graphical user interface could look in order to get feedback on the design.

There is no official guide yet. Check with the people on the general haiku mailing list for more information.


Artwork

Graphic Design

The actual need for a graphic artist is only occasional, such as new graphics for the Haiku website or T-shirt designs. Designs for the Haiku store at CafePress are always welcome. While many people can draw or do a passable job, there is a noticeable difference in quality when compared to a professional.

Marketing Material

New marketing material is always in short supply. One of the biggest challenges is to maintain a professional and serious image that is appealing to the general public and business community. The project can always use new and improved signs, posters, business cards or advertisements.


System resources

Vector Icons

Haiku uses a special Haiku Vector Icon Format (HVIF), which was developed so that it is highly optimized for small file sizes and fast rendering. That's why our icons are for the most part much smaller than either a bitmap or the widely used SVG format. You should start by reading about the format and the Haiku Icon making app 'Icon-O-Matic' in the Haiku User Guide.

The official Haiku Icon Guidelines should be your next port of call. This document is meant to define the distinctive Haiku look in further detail and to be a useful resource in case of doubt. Also, this document will hopefully provide you with help on what you should change if you have designed an icon and feel it doesn't seamlessly fit in with the rest of the system.

WallPapers

There is no official guide here. Check with the people on the general haiku mailing list for more information.

ScreenSavers

There is no official guide here. Check with the people on the general haiku mailing list for more information.

System Sounds

There is no official guide here. Check with the people on the general haiku mailing list for more information.