News Index

It's Official! Haiku Code Drive 2009!

News posted by mmadia on Fri, 2009-05-15 16:49

This year for Haiku Code Drive, the student selection process has been completely overhauled. Unlike last year, where a public vote was held to select the students, our mentors have determined the combinations of <student>-<project>-<mentor>. Since our requirements for Google Summer of Code were greatly improved upon from last year, our mentors were able to confidently decide which of those combinations have the highest chance of succeeding.

Full-text indexing and search tool for Haiku

  • Student: Ankur Sethi
  • Mentor: Rene Gollent
  • Project Abstract

    A plugin-based, full-text file indexing tool for Haiku, similar in functionality to OSX's Spotlight, GNOME's Tracker and SkyOS's Index Feeder. The main goal of the project is to make important documents and applications easily accessible and to reduce mouse usage.

Services Kit

  • Student: Tom Fairfield
  • Mentor: Pier Luigi Fiorini
  • Project Abstract

    The Services Kit will be a set of APIs that applications can use to communicate with various web services such as Facebook, Twitter, and Last.fm

There were several issues that limited this list. First, it is of utmost importance that Google Summer of Code remains the top priority. Based on that, the mentors have agreed that is not in the best interest of Haiku to encourage mentoring more than one student. Students such as Francesco Piccinno and JiSheng Zhang are participating in Google Summer of Code with other organizations and therefore are not eligible to participate in this year's Haiku Code Drive. Some students simply failed to reply to our requests to participate. Lastly, other students did not have someone capable of effectively mentoring them.

The format of Haiku Code Drive 2009, will in large be similar to last year. The timeline will closely follow Google Summer of Code's timeline. A stipend of $2,500 USD will be provided to successfully completed projects. Non-completed projects will be considered for half payment. The students will be encouraged to maintain a blog, provided to them on this website, with status updates. In general, they will be treated with the same respect and courtesy as our students who are participating through Google.

The finances for both students is already secured. As you may recall, some students from last year's Haiku Code Drive did not complete their projects. Due to this, $2,500 was left over and earmarked for future use. The other half of the money was paid to Haiku for our participation in Google Summer of Code 2008.

Interviews : Google Summer of Code Applicants

News posted by mmadia on Mon, 2009-05-04 14:27

In celebration and recognition of the hard work put in by all of this year's Google Summer of Code applicants, several of Haiku's news sites have coordinated with each other to provide those students with an opportunity to be interviewed. These interviews will be covered by BeOSNews, BeGroovy, Haiku Gazette, Haikuware, and IsComputerOn, and will be spread out over the following two weeks.

Update: All of the received interviews have now been posted! I would like to congratulate and thank all of the participating newsites on this extensive collaboration effort. If any additional translations become available, feel free to Contact Me

Update: IsComputerOn has conducted another interview with Alexey Burshtein

[1] Even though Johannes speaks English, his native language is German. As such Haiku Gazette was able to conduct the interview. The English translation will be provided to IsComputerOn.
[2] Tom was interviewed in English by his mentor, Pier Luigi Fiorini.

Google Allocates Six Students for Haiku in Summer of Code 2009!

News posted by mmadia on Sat, 2009-04-18 00:26

We are pleased to announce that Google has allotted us with six students for this year's Summer of Code program! This is quite an achievement, seeing as how Google accepted only 1000 students, which is about 10% less than in 2008. As with the year before, the quality of the proposals submitted by students has increased significantly. This year, students who applied to Haiku were suggested to fix an issue in our bug tracker. This provided our mentors with a glimpse into the students' programming ability, as well as their ambition. Those contributions, several of which have already been committed to our SVN repository, proved to be a valuable resource when ranking the students. This allowed our mentors to strike a balance between projects that fill a need in Haiku and projects by students who have also shown themselves to be a worthy Google Summer of Code student. These students went above and beyond our requirements and expectations. They gave us hope that come October, November, and beyond, they will still be making contributions to our community. Since retaining students as community developers is one of the goals of Summer of Code, it weighed heavily in our decision. Without further ado, here is the list of students who will be sponsored by Google to contribute to Haiku in Google's Summer of Code 2009:

Internationalization support for Haiku

CIFS client Implementation

Port Haiku to ARM architecture

Update DriveSetup/Disk_Device

Integrate WebKit in Haiku native browser

Implementing ZeroConf support for Haiku with mDNSResponder

We encourage everyone to continue the hospitality that has always been a part of our community. This has become a well-earned reputation for the members of Haiku's community.

We would like to take this time to express our gratitude for all students who have submitted project proposals. Many of you have displayed that your abilities rival those who were accepted. It is an unfortunate situation that we were not allocated more student slots by Google. We are looking at ways to express our appreciation of your efforts so far. In addition we are investigating the possibility of sponsoring another Haiku Code Drive. At this point, no decision has been made and we are welcoming comments on regarding this matter. If you would like feedback regarding your proposal and suggestions for next year, feel free to contact (Matt Madia).

Thank you to all who have and continue to take the time to make Haiku's participation in Google Summer of Code a successful adventure. This includes Google for sponsoring Summer of Code, the Melange developers and contributors, and of course Haiku's Mentors.

Haiku makes it into Google Summer of Code for third year in a row

News posted by mmadia on Wed, 2009-03-18 23:59
Haiku GSoC 2009 flierHaiku GSoC 2009 flier (pdf & hi res PNG)

Haiku's application for Google Summer of Code 2009™ has been accepted!

This year, the role of Haiku's Google Summer of Code primary administrator has been taken up by Matt Madia, with Stephan Aßmus acting as the backup administrator. Over the past few days, Google program administrators evaluated a total of 395 Mentoring organization applications and published their list of those accepted on Wednesday, March 18th 19:00 UTC. As you may imagine, time had seemingly slowed to a crawl in anticipation of the results!

As usual, we have created a list of suggested ideas. We encourage interested students to begin considering possible projects and more importantly to engage yourself in our community!

Here's some anecdotal data involving Google Summer of Code from the past and this year. The number of mentoring organizations has grown from 40 in 2005, to 100, to 130, and up to 175 in 2008. There were roughly 500 mentoring applications in 2008, however a good portion of those were "spammy" and does not represent an accurate count of actual applications. Google's application process this year has greatly reduced the number of "spammy" applications. The number of participating students in 2005 was 400 and has grown over the years to 1125 as of last year. For this year, Google will be establishing a cap of around 1000 students for 2009.

Haiku presence at Chemnitzer Linux-Tage

News posted by umccullough on Sat, 2009-03-07 08:43

If you happen to be visiting the Chemnitzer Linux-Tage conference on March 14-15, 2009, make sure to stop by the Haiku booth and say "Hi!". Attending this year on behalf of Haiku will be Stephan Aßmus, Axel Dörfler, Denise Wein and Daniel Wünsch.


Chemnitzer Linux-Tage 2009

The Haiku booth is next to the one of the Fedora Linux project, together with many other open source operating systems like FreeBSD, Ubuntu, openSUSE, NetBSD, OpenBSD, etc.

The Chemnitzer Linux-Tage are an event around the topic Linux and open source for everyone. The entrance ticket costs 5 EUR for both days (3 EUR for students). The event will be held at the following location:

Universität Chemnitz
Reichenhainer Straße 90
Chemnitz, 09126

Website Upgraded to Drupal 5

News posted by nielx on Wed, 2009-02-25 19:49

This Saturday, the 28th of February, the software that powers the website, Drupal and 47 (!) modules, have been upgraded to the Drupal 5 platform. This upgrade creates the foundation to continue to improve the functionality and information on our website, as the demands change, also in the face of the upcoming Alpha 1 release.

While the upgrade team has concluded that most of the data migrated smoothly, there are some rough edges. Most notably, the data of the conferences did not migrate properly, and as such, we are now in the process of reconstructing the conference module. Please read on for a more detailed list of issues. Naturally we expect some more minor issues popping up. If you find any one of them, please check out the list below, and if the issue is not there, drop a comment!

The known issues are the following:

  • The conference functionality has disappeared.
  • Pages like the about page show authoring information, while it did not used to.
  • The OSNews and Slashdot icons are missing from the teasers
  • The Read more link needs some styling.
  • The image system needs an overhaul.
  • The legacy docs need to be restored. Reported by adek336
  • The lay-out underperforms on wide screens. Reported by kallisti5.
  • The new image gallery (thanks Remi!) has a wrong reference to certain paths
  • Updated copyright notices (meta tags and footer)
  • Changed "Haiku Screenshot Tour" under the "Learn More" block in the About page to point to the new gallery.

Drop a comment if there is more. We did not thoroughly test the functionality with the different permission groups. Is anything not working, while it used to work? Drop a line!

Haiku Finally Gets a Native GCC4 - full story inside!

News posted by umccullough on Sun, 2009-02-01 04:25
Michael's Quad-core compiling GCC4.3.3Michael's Quad-core compiling GCC4.3.3

As many Haiku community members know, one major hurdle that has been making it difficult to port new software to Haiku has been the lack of an up-to-date GCC4 compiler. While a GCC 4.1.2 cross-compiler has been available now for some time, cross-compiling software for a GCC4-built Haiku can be painful and frustrating. What Haiku really needed was a native GCC4 toolchain to run on a GCC4-built Haiku install.

That time is now! A native Haiku GCC4.3.3 is now a reality.

Michael Lotz set out to tackle this task and the fruits of his labor have finally been committed to the Haiku repository for all to benefit from.

Michael Lotz details the process he used

To demonstrate what process was necessary to perform this task, he has written a detailed blog post recounting his experience. It's a long read, and certainly lists some confusing concepts. If you were at all curious what it would take, going from a GCC2-built Haiku to a GCC4-built Haiku with its own native compiler, the steps are all there.

During the process, Michael was even "fortunate" to find and submit a patch for a bug in libiberty. You will read about the strange behavior that led to the discovery in his blog post.

Dogfooding is important... Yummy!

If you're paying attention while reading his blog, you'll note that Michael is "dogfooding" during his Haiku development. Not only does he use Haiku for development purposes, but it's also the only operating system he uses currently. This suggests a couple of important points: a) Haiku is stable enough to use daily and develop in and b) Haiku developers are serious about Haiku, intending to use it as their daily OS. I know of several developers who use Haiku daily for various tasks, including development. This demonstrates a dedication to the quality they are pursuing, and increases the likelihood that even little annoying things about Haiku are going to get fixed eventually.

What does all this mean? What's next?

Freshly-built Haiku running GCC4Freshly-built Haiku running GCC4

So, what should we expect from Haiku now that it has a native GCC4 toolchain?

I'm not sure - and that's the exciting part actually! This opens the door for easier porting of modern software, and more easily moves Haiku out of the "dark" GCC2 cloud that BeOS had lived under.

Several existing Haiku porting projects already require GCC4 to proceed and/or update to latest versions: Firefox 3, Webkit, VLC, and more.

Haiku already supports a "hybrid" environment where it is built with GCC2 for backward compatibility but also providing GCC4 libraries for future software support - or even more interesting: a GCC4-built Haiku with GCC2 libraries for backward compatibility. I think we'll see the latter becoming more common now with the availability of a native GCC4.

There are still some minor loose ends to tie up - such as providing the remaining development tools for a GCC4 Haiku (the GCC2-built ones will work, but they are not yet automatically installed with the "Development" optional package). Additionally, those who wish to build a GCC4 Haiku from within an existing GCC2-built Haiku might find it a little bit challenging. If you'd like to experiment, you may want to compile your own GCC4 Haiku from Linux, BSD, etc., or even wait for the availability of pre-built GCC4 images to appear.

These are very interesting developments, I hope you're as excited as I am at what the future holds :)

Happy Holidays from Haiku!

News posted by umccullough on Thu, 2008-12-25 21:18

On behalf of Haiku, we'd like to wish everyone Happy Holidays!

While the news may seem a little slow lately (people are likely busy during the holiday season), there has indeed been a few things happening of note.

One exciting announcement was from Christof Lutteroth letting us know that some final-year projects from the University of Auckland were prototyped using Haiku. While these prototypes and the code behind them are not yet publicly available, they have generously offered to donate this code to Haiku in the future.

In other developments, we have seen some improvements to Haiku's network drivers, including a couple drivers ported from FreeBSD by Ithamar Adema to improve the wired LAN support for EeePCs. Ithamar has also reported that he would like to work on porting FreeBSD's wireless stack where Fredrik Holmqvist left off.

It also seems that Oliver Ruiz Dorantes has recently completed Phase 1 of his Bluetooth stack and thus completed the associated Haikuware bounty.

There have been many other improvements to Haiku recently and you can always see what's going on in the Haiku Trac Timeline if you need a "quick fix". :)

Mailing list change

News posted by axeld on Wed, 2008-10-22 14:42

At the end of the month, the main user mailing list openbeos@freelists.org will finally be renamed to haiku@freelists.org, removing the most apparent reference to our previous name, OpenBeOS, that our project had until summer of 2004. The old archive will remain accessible, and all subscribers will be moved to the new list automatically. We'll even send you a reminder when it's done, so that you'll remember to send future mails to haiku@freelists.org instead.

Thanks to FreeLists.org for making this possible, they have provided an awesome service for us over the past 7 years!

Impression from BeGeistert 019

News posted on Fri, 2008-10-17 08:36

Stephan Aßmus asked me if I'd like to translate my article on BeGeistert 019 http://haiku-gazette.blogspot.com/2008/10/das-war-begeistert-019.html to English. How could I refuse? :) Here it is:

BeGeistert 019 was held last weekend in Düsseldorf and was, as far as I can tell, a great success. I've been to BeGeistert twice in the past (I think 2002 and 2003) and in my opinion the spirit of BeGeistert hasn't changed since then. Maybe there used to be some more non-coders among the guests and the focus was more on applications; that was of course because Haiku was still in its OpenBeOS nappies at that time...