Students

Student Application Mini-FAQ Where do I apply? Start from the Google Summer of Code site What ideas can I apply for? You can suggest your own idea(s) or check out our List of Google Summer of Code Ideas What info do you need in the application? See the Application Template below for reference What if I still have questions? Send a message to the Haiku Mailing List or contact Haiku's Google Summer of Code administrator (Adrien Destugues).

GSoC 2017

The Google Summer of Code™ 2018 is coming up. Haiku plans to apply for its 9th participation. Why does Haiku want to participate? The Google Summer of Code is a wonderful opportunity for the Haiku Project. It exposes Haiku to many potential youthful and energetic minds that are interested in developing Open Source Software. Even more exciting, it provides a unique opportunity of generating income for the Project while growing a handful of carefully selected students into knowledgeable and potential long-term contributors.

Ideas

For information about Haiku's participation in GSoC this year, please see this page. Qualifying students can apply for a Haiku project (see the list of suggested projects below). For details about how to apply, please check out Students: How to Apply for a Haiku Idea. According to other mentor organizations, the most successful Google Summer of Code projects are often those proposed by the students themselves. The following list represents some of our ideas and wishes for the project.

Network Booting Haiku

The root Haiku disk image (raw variant) can be booted remotely over the local network as of recent versions. This is especially useful when an architectures boot and kernel issues need to be troubleshot. In the example below we will cover remote booting Haiku on various architectures. At the moment this is mostly geared toward developers. Requirements: Haiku source code and build environment Linux build tools Enough memory on the test system.

Serial Debugging

Hardware Serial Debugging Hardware Your system needs to have a built-in serial port to leverage Serial Debugging. Modern laptops commonly lack this port. Desktops will generally have a serial port or a mainboard header for serial port. Hardware Required A problematic system with an available built-in serial port. A main board header (if required for problematic system) A second system to capture logs and interact with the system under test.

Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting operating system problems can be difficult. To give us the best assistance resolving bugs within Haiku, please be sure to add details to existing bug reports, or create a new bug report with as much information as possible. More information on reporting bugs can be found here Boot Problems When Haiku fails to boot on a machine, it generally fails in one of the following ways: White Kernel Debug Land (kdl) box Black screen after booting Instant reboot Kernel Debug land The Kernel Debug Land is the debugger built into Haiku’s kernel and represents a captured critical exception within the operating system.

Emulating Haiku in KVM

VMs are an ideal way of testing operating systems without having them physically installed. Installing Haiku into VM is a solution for those who don’t want to set it up into a physical computer. There are several methods offered to install Haiku. These include VMDK images, Raw images, ISO images and Anyboot images which are a hybrid of the latter two images. The Raw image (and thus the Anyboot image) is a preinstalled environment, in which the Virtual Hard Disk size cannot be customized, but going through the installation process is not required.

GSoC 2017

The Google Summer of Code™ 2017 is coming up soon - Haiku was accepted as Mentoring Organization once again! This will be the eighth year, in which Haiku was selected to participate as one of the mentoring organizations. Why does Haiku want to participate? The Google Summer of Code is a wonderful opportunity for the Haiku Project. It exposes Haiku to many potential youthful and energetic minds that are interested in developing Open Source Software.

Ideas

For information about Haiku's participation in GSoC this year, please see this page. Qualifying students can apply for a Haiku project (see the list of suggested projects below). For details about how to apply, please check out Students: How to Apply for a Haiku Idea. According to other mentor organizations, the most successful Google Summer of Code projects are often those proposed by the students themselves. The following list represents some of our ideas and wishes for the project.

Software Sites

Here's a list of sites providing 3rd party software for Haiku. Some offer a direct download of HPKG packages or zip archives, others have a repository which you can add to Haiku with the "Repositories" preference panel. BeBytes - The BeOS Software Archive: A software archive like the old BeBits in BeOS times. BeSly Software Repo: A repository for Haiku software. Clasqm's repo: A repository with a huge collection mainly of packaged BeOS applications, but also new Haiku software, documentation, fonts, demos and other things.